Native Americans Exploited in Medical Fraud Operations


In Gallup, New Mexico, officials want to be clear, they want attention and awareness behind recent kidnappings targeting Native Americans and a medical fraud scheme that has gotten out of hand. there is I didn’t know something like that was going on and it hurt my neck,” said Gallup Mayor Luis Bonaguidi. Police said the vulnerable Native Americans were being picked up by car and promised resources to provide food, housing and rehabilitation. “Gallup Police Department was investigating 32 reports of missing persons suspected of being taken to the Phoenix area,” the Gallup Police Department said in a statement. Chief Erin Toadrena-Pablo said 18 of the 32 cases have been resolved and 14 are still ongoing. In response, Arizona has suspended more than 100 facilities that may have been involved in what authorities called “predatory recruitment,” but Bonaguidi said it’s the state of New Mexico. He said he had reason to believe it was happening across the country. “This incident is happening in Albuquerque, Farmington, here, everywhere you can,” Bonaguidi said. Chief Erin Toadrena-Pablo said police were investigating reports from last year. Toadrena-Pablo said several police departments and state agencies are working to find out the truth. “There really is only one way to gather a lot of information about these disappearances, and time is of the essence,” Bonaguidi said. He has reached out to state officials, such as the Attorney General, to continue working on this issue while local law enforcement seeks to gather further information.

In Gallup, New Mexico, officials want to be clear, they want attention and awareness behind the recent kidnappings and spiraling medical fraud schemes targeting Native Americans. .

Gallup Mayor Luis Bonaguidi said, “I didn’t know something like that was happening, so it hit me in a way that made the hairs on the back of my neck stand on end.”

Police said vulnerable Native Americans were being picked up by car and promised resources for food and housing rehabilitation.

Gallup Police Chief Erin Toadrena Pablo said, “The Gallup Police Department was investigating 32 reports of missing persons suspected of being taken to the Phoenix area.”

Of the 32 cases, 18 have been resolved and 14 are still in progress. In response, Arizona has suspended more than 100 facilities suspected of engaging in what authorities called “predatory recruitment.”

Bonaguidi says he has reason to believe it’s happening all over New Mexico.

“This is happening in Albuquerque, Farmington, here, wherever possible,” Bonaguidi said.

Chief Erin Toadrena-Pablo said police have been investigating the report since last year. He said several police departments and state agencies are working to find out the truth.

β€œIt really takes one shot to gather a lot of information about these missing person cases. Time is of the essence,” Toadrena Pablo said.

Bonaguidi plans to continue working on the issue by communicating with state officials, including the attorney general, while local law enforcement seeks more information.



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