Lawmakers Vote to Repeal Certificate of Need


The South Carolina Legislature voted overwhelmingly to change the health care industry in the state. Lawmakers are repealing the state’s Certificate of Need, enacted in 1971. This is intended to help contain costs and prevent unnecessary duplication of healthcare facilities and services. Establishment of health facilities and services that best meet the needs of the public and ensure that high quality services are provided in health facilities in this province, according to the Ministry of Health and Environmental Management. Under the Certificate of Need, providers wishing to expand or build new facilities must obtain approval from state health authorities, a request that competitors can challenge. It was intended to promote affordable health care and eliminate unnecessary duplication of services, but many lawmakers say it does more harm than good. Having overwhelmingly approved a bill designed to repeal the Certificate of Need, Gov. Henry McMaster confirmed Thursday that he will sign the bill into law. One of his legislators who has worked to repeal the Certificate of Need is Greenville County Rep. Mike Burns. If you wait in line for months, the pendulum should swing in the opposite direction,” Burns said. Lawmakers argue that it fosters monopolies in healthcare and, among other things, drives up costs. “Right now, in upstate Greenville County alone, there are tens of millions of dollars of investors waiting to get more access,” Barnes said. Large healthcare systems, including Prisma Health, do not support efforts to remove the Certificate of Need. Prisma Health spokeswoman Tammie Epps released a statement at WYFF 4 Thursday. Carolina. However, Prisma Health is ready and committed to continuing its mission of serving patients and communities in an ever-changing and competitive healthcare environment. Carolina’s Certificate of Need program to meet the modern needs of the state’s hospitals and health care system. We endorse the plan passed by the General Assembly to provide access in South Carolina. It also ensures that we need to provide a certain level of poverty care. While this is a big change for our healthcare community, state hospitals will continue to provide quality prevention to the people of South Carolina. and life-saving care,” said Shipp Ames, vice president of strategic marketing and communications.

The South Carolina Legislature voted overwhelmingly to change the health care industry in the state.

Legislators are trying to repeal the state certification requirement enacted in 1971.

Promote cost containment, prevent unnecessary duplication of health care facilities and services, guide the establishment of health care facilities and services that best meet the needs of the public, and ensure that health care facilities in the state provide high quality services. It is intended to Department of Health and Environmental Management.

Under the Certificate of Need, providers wishing to expand or build new facilities must obtain approval from state health authorities, a request that competitors can challenge.

It was intended to promote affordable health care and eliminate unnecessary duplication of services, but many lawmakers say it does more harm than good.

The House and Senate overwhelmingly approved a bill designed to repeal the Certificate of Need, and Gov. Henry McMaster confirmed Thursday that the bill will be signed into law.

One lawmaker who has worked to repeal the Certificate of Need is Rep. Mike Burns of Greenville County.

“Many South Carolinians lack access to prompt health care, and over the years, what used to take a week or two to complete has been queuing for hours to complete. Wait a month, and this should start the pendulum going back, another way,” Barnes said.

Lawmakers argue that it fosters monopolies in healthcare and, among other things, drives up costs.

“Right now, in upstate Greenville County alone, there are tens of millions of dollars of investors waiting to get more access,” Barnes said.

Large healthcare systems, including Prisma Health, do not support efforts to remove the Certificate of Need. Her spokesperson for Prisma Health, Tammie Epps, released a statement to her WYFF 4 on Thursday.

“As an organization that provides care for all in many rural and urban areas of South Carolina, we remain concerned about the accessibility of healthcare even after South Carolina’s CON requirements are phased out. However, Prisma Health stands ready and committed to continuing its mission of serving patients and communities in an ever-changing and competitive healthcare environment.”

The South Carolina Hospital Association also issued a statement at WYFF 4.

“SCHA has long supported the reform of South Carolina’s Certificate of Need program to meet the latest needs of South Carolina’s hospitals and healthcare system. We endorse the plan passed by the General Assembly to provide a period of time for the impact of this important legislation on access to healthcare in South Carolina. This is a big change for our medical community. We will continue to provide people with high-quality preventative and life-saving care,” said Schipp Ames, vice president of strategic marketing and communications.



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