Key Influencers in Successful Pregnant Cannabis Use Disorder Treatment


summary: Pregnant women are more likely to complete cannabis use disorder (CUD) treatment with a referral from the legal system, community partner, or health care provider. This study provides new insights into treatment outcomes for pregnant women seeking CUD treatment at publicly funded facilities.

Findings also showed that only 30% of pregnant women completed treatment, requiring 4-12 months of hospital stay to complete treatment. Employment was another factor that contributed to her successful CUD treatment.

Important facts:

  1. This is the first study to examine the outcome of CUD treatment for pregnant women seeking help in a publicly funded facility.
  2. Factors such as the judicial system, community partners, referrals from health care providers, length of stay, and employment status play an important role in the success of CUD treatment.
  3. This study highlights the need for targeted CUD treatment for the pregnant population given the increased CUD rates, accessibility to cannabis, and efficacy.

sauce: George Mason University

An estimated 4-7% of women use cannabis during pregnancy, and maternal cannabis use disorder (CUD) is on the rise in the United States.

A growing body of evidence suggests that cannabis use during pregnancy can adversely affect the health of mothers and their children, including increased chances of premature birth, low birth weight and infant mortality.

Despite the widespread legalization of cannabis, rising rates of CUD, and the associated negative health effects, research into treatment for this population is limited.

A new study by Professor Panagiota (Yiota) Kitsantas found that pregnant women were more likely to complete CUD treatment if they received a referral from the legal system, community partner, or health care provider.

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcome of CUD in pregnant women seeking treatment at a publicly funded facility.

It is a work depicting a pregnant woman and a leaf.
A new study by Professor Panagiota (Yiota) Kitsantas found that pregnant women were more likely to complete CUD treatment if they received a referral from the legal system, community partner, or health care provider.Credit: Neuroscience News

“Better understanding of the factors that influence the treatment of CUD in pregnant women will provide valuable information for prenatal care providers. and may encourage them to seek ongoing treatment.

“With increasing CUD rates, cannabis availability and efficacy, the development of targeted CUD treatments for pregnant women is very important,” said Xantas.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people are diagnosed with CUD when marijuana causes health and social problems in their lives but they can’t stop using it.

Additionally, the study found that only 30 percent of pregnant women completed treatment for CUD, and that treatment completion was associated with 4 to 12 months of hospitalization. Employment is another factor that increases the success rate of CUD treatment.

Treatment outcomes for pregnant women with cannabis use disorders The paper will be published online in April 2023 and will be published in Addictive Behavior in September 2023. Associate Professor Gilbert Gim and Medical Services Research PhD student Salman Aljoudi are the authors of the paper.

The George Mason University School of Public Health funded the study. This study was a secondary data analysis of treatment episodes, datasets, and hospital discharges from 2010 to 2019 in pregnant women who reported cannabis use disorders, using descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and classification tree analysis. To evaluate treatment results.

About this cannabis use disorder research news

author: Mary Cunningham
sauce: George Mason University
contact: Mary Cunningham – George Mason University
image: Image credited to Neuroscience News

Original research: open access.
Outcomes in pregnant women with cannabis use disorders. Gilbert Gimm et al. addictive behavior


overview

Treatment outcomes for pregnant women with cannabis use disorders

Pregnant cannabis use disorder (CUD) is on the rise in the United States. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends banning cannabis use during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

However, research on CUD treatment in this vulnerable population is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors influencing the completion of her CUD treatment in a pregnant woman.

Data from the 2010–2019 Treatment Episodes Dataset-Number of Hospital Discharges (TEDS-D) were used (n = 7,319 previously treatment-naive pregnant women reporting CUD). Descriptive statistics, logistic regression and classification tree analysis were performed to assess treatment outcomes.

Only 30.3% of the samples completed CUD treatment. Length of hospital stay between 4 and 12 months was associated with a higher likelihood of CUD treatment completion.

Probability of treatment completion was higher when the referral source was an alcohol/drug use caregiver (AOR = 1.60, 95% CI) [1.01, 2.54]), referrals from other communities (AOR = 1.65, 95% CI [1.38, 1.97]), and courts/criminal justice (AOR = 2.29, 95% CI [1.92, 2.72]) related to being referenced by an individual/self.

A relatively high proportion (52%) of pregnant women who continued CUD treatment for at least one month and were referred to a treatment program by the criminal justice system were observed to complete CUD treatment.

For pregnant women, referrals from the legal system, community, and health care providers increase the chances of success with CUD treatment.

With increasing CUD rates, cannabis availability, and efficacy, the development of targeted CUD treatments for the pregnant population is of great importance.



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