Fungal Outbreak in US Linked to Cosmetic Surgery in Mexico


A woman in Mexico who underwent cosmetic surgery, including liposuction, died and four others were hospitalized.

Aged in their 30s and 50s, they were diagnosed with fungal meningitis (swelling of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord caused by a fungal infection).

They all traveled from Texas to a clinic in Matamoros on the Mexican border and developed fatal symptoms that could lead to seizures and coma after three days to six weeks.

The surgery took place between February and April, and US health officials sounded the alarm over the case, urging Americans to stop medical procedures in Matamoros.

It is not known what type of fungus the patient contracted, but C. auris cases are on the rise in the United States related to hospitals not properly sterilizing equipment.

A woman who underwent cosmetic surgery such as liposuction died in Mexico, and four others were hospitalized.Health officials say they were treated at clinics such as the Riverside Surgical Center.

Some were treated at Clinica K-3 in Matamoros, Mexico

A woman who underwent cosmetic surgery such as liposuction died in Mexico, and four others were hospitalized. Health officials said the women were treated at clinics including the Riverside Surgical Center (left) and Clinica K-3 (right) in Matamoros, Mexico.

The map above shows the location of Matamoros where the procedure took place.people are urged not to go there for medical procedures

The map above shows the location of Matamoros where the procedure took place.people are urged not to go there for medical procedures

About 1.2 million U.S. residents annually visit Mexico for elective surgeries at discounted rates, according to Medical Tourism Mexico, which advertises that patients can save up to 80% on comparable surgeries in the U.S. there is

About 1.2 million U.S. residents annually visit Mexico for elective surgeries at discounted rates, according to Medical Tourism Mexico, which advertises that patients can save up to 80% on comparable surgeries in the U.S. there is

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Texas Department of Health issued an alert Tuesday about the case.

They said each patient had received an epidural, in which an anesthetic is injected into the area around the spinal cord to numb the pain.

Clinics visited by the women included the Riverside Surgical Center, which offers liposuction and Brazilian hip lifts.

At this time, it was not clear if these cases were related or where the patients were infected. Authorities are monitoring more cases.

The CDC has stepped up its vigilance and urged people who have appointments with epidural injections in Matamoros to cancel those treatments.

The agency added that those treated there after January should be alert for warning signs of meningitis.

Those with concerns were told to consult a doctor.

“It is very important that people who have had recent medical procedures in Mexico monitor themselves for symptoms of meningitis,” said Dr. Jennifer Schford of the Texas Department of Health.

“Meningitis, especially when caused by bacteria or fungi, can be a life-threatening disease if not treated promptly.”

The medical tourism industry is booming south of the U.S. border, where medical care can be obtained for a fraction of the cost in the United States.

Statistics show that about one million Americans cross the border each year to seek medical attention.

Matamoros was also the site of an attack on four Americans in March that left two dead.

Meningitis is swelling of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord caused by an infection.

This may be caused by infection of these areas by fungi such as Blastomyces, which caused outbreaks in Michigan, and Candida albicans, the fungus behind candidiasis.

Patients cannot spread the infection to others, but symptoms may include fever, severe headache, stiff neck, and photosensitivity.

Patients can have seizures, fall into a coma, and then die from the infection.

The women were diagnosed with fungal meningitis, or swelling of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord caused by a fungal infection.

The women were diagnosed with fungal meningitis, or swelling of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord caused by a fungal infection.

Treatment includes a series of intravenous antifungal drugs, usually by an infusion. They may take the drug for 6 months to 1 year.

This comes after a Fungal Valley Fever victim revealed a five-year hellish battle with the disease.

Business owner Nick Duggan, 45, is one of about 20,000 people who contract the disease each year, caused by the fungal species coccidioidomycosis, and scientists say the disease will become more common as the climate warms. warns that is becoming more common.

The Australian native likely contracted the disease in 2010 while riding a quad bike in the San Diego desert while visiting his wife’s family. He believes he inhaled fungal spores that had been lifted up in the dust.

By the time doctors figured out the cause, the infection had spread to his spine and brain, causing meningitis that left him bedridden for four months and in and out of the hospital for five years.



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