Bank of America Awarded for Improving Health Care in Resource-Short Areas


Bank of America employees in California participate in a local Heart Walk. In June, the bank will receive the American Heart Association Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of its commitment to better health care for all.  (Photo credit: Bank of America)
Bank of America employees in California participate in a local Heart Walk. In June, the bank will receive the American Heart Association Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of its commitment to better health care for all. (Photo credit: Bank of America)

At Bank of America, investing in community health care starts at the top with dedicated, caring executives.

These executives include Chairman and CEO Brian Moynihan and Chief Audit Officer Kristin Katziff, Bank of America Foundation Chairman Ebony Thomas and Senior Vice President Kimmerin Harris. includes Mr. Together with colleagues, they contributed to Bank of America’s $25 million initiative to increase access to health services in resource-poor communities, including a $10 million donation to the American Heart Association. Did.

“People may not expect financial services companies like Bank of America to be involved in health initiatives,” Katsif said. “But it’s really at the heart of what we do. Healthier, more equitable communities thrive, driving economic development, which makes communities even stronger.”

To recognize the company’s efforts, the AHA will present Bank of America with a Meritorious Award, which is awarded annually to an organization or individual who has made a nationally significant contribution. The award will be presented at the AHA’s National Volunteer Awards Virtual Public Ceremony on June 14, 6-8 p.m. in Central.

The bank and its medical partners, including the AHA, are working together in 11 cities to combat health disparities exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. This effort increases access to quality health care and promotes policies that ensure equitable opportunities and resources for all.

“The pandemic has revealed the depth of health inequalities that exist today,” said Thomas, who focuses on racial equality and economic opportunity as president of the foundation. “Our goal is to build strong private partnerships to make a difference in health outcomes.

“What sets this initiative apart is the flexible, ultra-local approach designed for each community because the needs of Charlotte, North Carolina, are very different than those of Memphis, Tennessee or Albuquerque, New Mexico. It’s from.”

Bank of America leaders Marilyn K. Bush and Katie Fisher join representatives of the American Cancer Society, American Diabetes Association and AHA on the field at a Cardinals game to promote wellness in St. Louis. Capital to commemorate the launch of a joint initiative. St. Louis is he one of 11 cities covered by this initiative.  (Photo credit: Bank of America)
Bank of America leaders Marilyn K. Bush and Katie Fisher join representatives of the American Cancer Society, American Diabetes Association and AHA on the field at a Cardinals game to promote wellness in St. Louis. Capital to commemorate the launch of a joint initiative. St. Louis is he one of 11 cities covered by this initiative. (Photo credit: Bank of America)

Some Bank of America team members have a personal commitment to improving health equity.

Growing up in the suburbs of Charlotte, Thomas knew the importance of emergency care. Her father was a paramedic. This year, when she had a minor heart attack, she knew all too well her red flags, so she immediately sought her help.

A recovering Thomas ponders the excellent medical care he received compared to the suboptimal care his grandmother received while battling cancer in rural Virginia in the early 1990s.

“I get emotional thinking about my grandmother living in a medical desert without a strong support system and not knowing how to navigate the healthcare system,” she said. .

“In some ways, we have made great strides in health care over the last two generations. I have to admit it,” Startes. “

Kajif’s mission to improve access to healthcare also has personal roots. When his seemingly healthy mother died of a heart attack in 2014, Katsif immediately went to work.

“I’m very analytical, so I’m like, ‘Okay, how did this happen? And how can we raise awareness so that it doesn’t happen to other people?’ said Katsif, who is also the association’s executive vice president. Global Diversity & Inclusion Council of Banks.

She soon began volunteering at the AHA in Charlotte and later became a member of the Go Red for Women National Leadership Council.

Now she’s thrilled that Bank of America is partnering with the AHA.

“The goal is to level the playing field when it comes to health equity,” Katsif said. “Through this partnership with the AHA, we hope to raise community awareness and support that they may not otherwise receive. We want to help people live longer, healthier lives.”



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